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  If you steal a neighbor's wifi..
nasty_pelosi
F U K U

2148 posts

Does it typically show your hardware's Mac ID in that tard's router config?

So it would show a Mac ID belonging to a Apple laptop, for example, if you were very ghey and using that? Unless, of course, you had a program to mask/change it.
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Unregistered

nasty_pelosi said:Does it typically show your hardware's Mac ID in that tard's router config?

So it would show a Mac ID belonging to a Apple laptop, for example, if you were very ghey and using that? Unless, of course, you had a program to mask/change it.



yes
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Unregistered

nasty_pelosi said:Does it typically show your hardware's Mac ID in that tard's router config?

So it would show a Mac ID belonging to a Apple laptop, for example, if you were very ghey and using that? Unless, of course, you had a program to mask/change it.

Yes.

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Unregistered

It also shows the computer's network name.

:mittens:
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Unregistered

. said:It also shows the computer's network name.

:mittens:

Bullshit, link?
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Unregistered

nasty_pelosi said:Does it typically show your hardware's Mac ID in that tard's router config?

So it would show a Mac ID belonging to a Apple laptop, for example, if you were very ghey and using that? Unless, of course, you had a program to mask/change it.

I'm not sure there is a log and anyone who leaves their WIFI open is not going to know enough to look for it.

Futhermore, I'm not convinced the Mac ID of connecting WIFI adapters is even easily identifiable.

The "yes"'ers don't know what the fuck they are talking about.
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Unregistered

. said:I'm not sure there is a log and anyone who leaves their WIFI open is not going to know enough to look for it.

Futhermore, I'm not convinced the Mac ID of connecting WIFI adapters is even easily identifiable.

The "yes"'ers don't know what the fuck they are talking about.


The yes'ers are right.
Also, the OP asked if the ID is logged only. Identification is another story.
(In doubt I would use a cash paid USB WLan adapter, just sayin )

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Unregistered

. said:I'm not sure there is a log and anyone who leaves their WIFI open is not going to know enough to look for it.

Futhermore, I'm not convinced the Mac ID of connecting WIFI adapters is even easily identifiable.

The "yes"'ers don't know what the fuck they are talking about.



This is troof. If your neighbor has an unsecured wifi be assured that they have never even heard of a Mac address. But be nice. I depend on my neighbor's unsecured wifi - on it right now, in fact.
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Unregistered

http://www.i-hacked.com/content/view/261/42/

No one will find you.
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Unregistered

. said:The yes'ers are right.
Also, the OP asked if the ID is logged only. Identification is another story.
(In doubt I would use a cash paid USB WLan adapter, just sayin )

if u r so worried u can always spoof your nac id...
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Unregistered

. said:This is troof. If your neighbor has an unsecured wifi be assured that they have never even heard of a Mac address. But be nice. I depend on my neighbor's unsecured wifi - on it right now, in fact.

But Officer, my neighbors cat must be the one using my unsecured wifi to download child pornography
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:milton:
Electric_Lights
better than most other posters

7841 posts

I've always wondered. Surely they can tell all the crappy pr0n sites you visit.
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Unregistered

:sadbanana: NObody in my area leaves their wifi unlocked
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:crybaby:
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Unregistered

. said:Futhermore, I'm not convinced the Mac ID of connecting WIFI adapters is even easily identifiable.

The "yes"'ers don't know what the fuck they are talking about.



All network devices that communicate via IP have a unique address.

A hardware MAC address (ethernet address).

They all have to be unique because otherwise when you plugged two computers into the wall, they would both be communicating with the same name.

To differentiate them, they each have a unique address.

When you buy a network card or a wireless card or any device that supports ethernet, it will have a unique address.

When you connect to a router, you will give it your ethernet address and tie it to an IP address. The ethernet address is only visible on the segment you are on.

All the machines connected to the same segment you are on will see your ethernet address.

If you are on a PC, you can look at the ethernet addresses that your computer knows about typing:

> arp -a

ARP is the address resolution protocol and shows the MAC addresses your computer knows about and the IPs they are associated with.

You will see the MAC address of whatever wireless router you are connected to. And they see your MAC.

On the wireless router, you can look at the ARP table to see who is / was connected.

If you have a known computer, you can check its ethernet address to see if it matches. The MAC address never changes.

Additionally, these unique addresses are doled out in groups to vendors so, from a MAC, you can find out the specific type of computer and the vendor will know the MAC of all the machines they have sold so you can track it down to the specific machine if you really want to do the work.

When Windows generates GUIDs (global unique identifiers) it uses the MAC as part of the GUID. So, Microsoft will also know your computer by your MAC.

There are hardware network devices that allow you to change the MAC to whatever you want. The vast, vast majority of them do not.

Compared to me, you basically know jack shit.
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Unregistered

nasty_pelosi said:Does it typically show your hardware's Mac ID in that tard's router config?

So it would show a Mac ID belonging to a Apple laptop, for example, if you were very ghey and using that? Unless, of course, you had a program to mask/change it.


:bump:
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Unregistered

The unique MAC address is not like an IP address by the way. You set a machines IP address.

You don't set a MAC. When you get the computer, it is already a unique value.
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Unregistered

. said:The unique MAC address is not like an IP address by the way. You set a machines IP address. You don't set a MAC. When you get the computer, it is already a unique value.



Here's where all the vendors get assigned their MAC address ranges:

http://standards.ieee.org/regauth/oui/index.shtml

You can search by company name.

Here's an article on spoofing the MAC addr of an iphone

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2008/01/mac-address-spo/
Asok
+++++

13975 posts

. said:The unique MAC address is not like an IP address by the way. You set a machines IP address.

You don't set a MAC. When you get the computer, it is already a unique value.



Yes, it comes with a unique value from the factory. But s/w usually allows you to set it to anything you want (aka Mac spoofing).

The router HAS to know the Mac adress. It is the address it uses to communicate with that machine.
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Unregistered

Why are you calling it "stealing"? You don't know the motivation for your neighbor to keep their wireless connection open. Maybe they want you to use it.
bipft
Not Right Now You Don't

10211 posts

I am so grateful to neighbors with open Wifi when I move into a new place and the cable company is late in installing my own.
Electric_Lights
better than most other posters

7841 posts

Thou shall not covet they neighbor's ass, thy neighbor's wifi, nor anything that is thy neighbors.
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:jew:
Correct.Motorcycle.
Unregistered

On all commercial routers if you are using a static IP they won't see your machine in the connected device pane, since it's not controlled by the routers DHCP.

They would have to scan their entire nat subnet in order to see you connected, in which case you need a good software firewall to block ICMP, ping, and all packets, in fact just connect with one static IP and block the rest of the range out so their scan just times on one your computer

amateurs
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:trev:
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Unregistered

Correct.Motorcycle. said:On all commercial routers if you are using a static IP they won't see your machine in the connected device pane, since it's not controlled by the routers DHCP.

They would have to scan their entire nat subnet in order to see you connected, in which case you need a good software firewall to block ICMP, ping, and all packets, in fact just connect with one static IP and block the rest of the range out so their scan just times on one your computer

amateurs
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:trev:


Ping uses ICMP.
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Unregistered

. said:Ping uses ICMP.



yes it does, but ping can stil be allowed if you disable ICMP inbound in the firewall..at least on a cisco and in zone alarm 8.

don't know about other firewalls, hardware or software.
RobertJHarsh
Ban me if you got the guts

-16559 posts

The best thing to do with wifi access is catalog such hot spots and use them for your activities when you need to and then never use it again.

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